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November 19th, 2014

SocialMedia_Nov17_AMany business owners looking to launch, or expand their social media presence, quickly find out that only interacting with one platform is not the best strategy. Instead, they branch out, join all the major platforms and quickly find that each is vastly different and can be a challenge to master. For those using Twitter, here are 10 best practices that can help you get the most out of it.

  1. Keep posts on the shorter side - This may seem ridiculous, after all there are only 140 characters allowed per tweet, but keeping tweets short allows users to add their own comments and ideas when they retweet. Try keeping your tweets below 100 characters.
  2. Twitter is not about promotion - Studies have proven that tweets that promote a company or product don't usually do as well as messages that are more conversational in nature. If you want to ensure maximum interaction, aim for a mixture of tweets that consists of about 80% conversational and 20% promotional.
  3. Know what time to tweet - Each market is different, so take the time to research tweeting habits. If you see that the majority of your target audience is active during after-work hours, then it would make sense to tweet when they are more likely to be online. Remember, many Twitter users are connecting via their mobile devices, so you are probably better off tweeting during lunch hours, as well as pre- and post-work.
  4. Know what days to tweet - Much like knowing what time to tweet, it is a good idea to also know which days are best to tweet in order to maximize engagement. For example, if you are trying to interact more with other businesses (B2B) then it is best to tweet on days when the companies are open and an owner or manager is more likely to be looking at business systems and social accounts. Customers, however, are usually more receptive to messages on days when they aren't working e.g., Saturday and Sunday.
  5. Use hashtags - Hashtags in Twitter allow for categorization and make tweets searchable. For example, if you use the hashtag #fresh in a tweet and then search for 'fresh' on Twitter, you should see similar posts using the same hashtag.
  6. Use hashtags sparingly - There is a common trend in social media to use hashtags for nearly every word. This makes posts difficult to read and usually leads to people not sharing or retweeting your content. Instead, try to work one to three hashtag, at most, into your tweets naturally.
  7. Realize Twitter moves fast - The average trend on Twitter lasts about one hour, to one day. So, if you see a trend developing or beginning, act quick to join the conversation. Posting after the trend has faded will usually lead to tweets being ignored.
  8. Don't act on every trend - Trends come and go so quickly on Twitter that it can be tempting to try to jump on each one, or as many as possible, in order to get your message out to as many people as possible. However, not every style and subject will be relevant to your business. By shoehorning content to fit trends you could come across as insincere and lose interest from followers.
  9. Watch who you follow - Following people is one of the quickest ways to grow your own follower base - usually because users will follow those who follow them. But, when it come to business, you want to be sure to follow users who are relevant. For example, follow your customers, strategic partners, and even competitors. Following Twitter users who aren't relevant to your business is not going to get your messages read by the right people.
  10. Keep an eye on Twitter - In order to effectively spot trends and see what your target market is saying, it is worthwhile to use a program like Tweetdeck, which allows you to see all tweets, track hashtags, topics, and more.
If you would like to learn more about using Twitter in your business, contact us today to see how our services and solutions can boost your social media presence.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
November 13th, 2014

Security_Nov10_AIs your business secure from the latest malware and security threats? The truth of the matter is that there is always a chance that your business and systems can be attacked and breached by a variety of security threats. One of the more common threats of last year was a nasty piece of ransomware called Cryptolocker. While the first version has largely been dealt with, there is news that a new version of this - called CryptoWall - which has surfaced.

What is Crypto malware?

Crypto malware is a type of trojan horse that when installed onto computers or devices, holds the data and system hostage. This is done by locking valuable or important files with a strong encryption. You then see a pop-up open informing you that you have a set amount of time to pay for a key which will unlock the encryption. If you don't pay before the deadline, your files are deleted.

When this malware surfaced last year, many users were understandably more than a little worried and took strong precautions to ensure they did not get infected. Despite these efforts, it really didn't go away until earlier this year, when security experts introduced a number of online portals that can un-encrypt files affected by Cryptolocker, essentially neutralizing the threat, until now that is. A recently updated version is threatening users once again.

Cryptolocker 2.0, aka. CryptoWall

Possibly because of efforts by security firms to neutralize the Cryptolocker threat, the various developers of the malware have come back with an improved version, CryptoWall and it is a threat that all businesses should be aware of.

With CryptoWall, the transmission and infection methods remain the same as they did with the first version: It is most commonly found in zipped folders and PDF files sent over email. Most emails with the malware are disguised as invoices, bills, complaints, and other business messages that we are likely to open.

The developers did however make some "improvements" to the malware that make it more difficult to deal with for most users. These changes include:

  • Unique IDs are used for payment: These are addresses used to verify that the payment is unique and from one person only. If the address is used by another user, payment will now be rejected. This is different from the first version where one person who paid could share the unlock code with other infected users.
  • CryptoWall can securely delete files: In the older version of this threat, files were deleted if the ransom wasn't paid, but they could be recovered easily. In the new version the encryption has increased security which ensures the file is deleted. This leaves you with either the option of paying the ransom or retrieving the file from a backup.
  • Payment servers can't be blocked: With CryptoLocker, when authorities and security experts found the addresses of the servers that accepted payments they were able to add these to blacklists, thus ensuring no traffic would come from, or go to, these servers again. Essentially, this made it impossible for the malware to actually work. Now, it has been found that the developers are using their own servers and gateways which essentially makes them much, much more difficult to find and ban.

How do I prevent my systems and devices from being infected?

Unlike other viruses and malware, CryptoWall doesn't go after passwords or account names, so the usual changing of your passwords won't really help. The best ways to prevent this from getting onto your systems is:
  • Don't open any suspicious attachments - Look at each and every email attachment that comes into your inbox. If you spot anything that looks odd, such as say a spelling mistake in the name, or a long string of characters together, then it is best to avoid opening it.
  • Don't open emails from unknown sources - Be extra careful about emails from unknown sources, especially ones that say they provide business oriented information e.g., bank statements from banks you don't have an account with or bills from a utilities company you don't use. Chances are high that they contain some form of malware.
Should your files be attacked and encrypted by this malware, then the first thing you should do is to contact us. We can work with you to help find a solution that will not end up in you having to pay the ransom to recover your files.

If you are looking to learn more about CryptoWall malware and how to boost your security and protect your data and systems, then we could you your first line of tech defence.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
November 12th, 2014

Productivity_Nov10_AAs a business owner or manager there is a good chance that a fair number of the emails you send out to your employees are with the purpose that they then send a message to a third party on your behalf. When drafting this message however, there may be some back and forth before it is actually sent out. This can drain productivity, but can easily be avoided by including a pre-draft in the original email.

What exactly is a pre-draft?

The idea behind pre-drafting an email message is that it helps to reduce the amount of back and forth between two parties when one of the parties is contacting a third party. If you have ever had an employee draft a message that came from you then you are likely well aware of the number of emails that can go back and forth before the email actually goes out.

Essentially a pre-draft is a message included in the original message that is to be sent along to a third party. When you include a draft message, the person who will be sending the message can then just cut and paste the content, personalize it, maybe tweak a sentence here or there, and then send it along.

How do I create one?

If you are currently working on an email message that will be sent by another employee on your behalf, try to come up with the outline and basic message yourself. It's best to clearly mark this message in the original email by using a flag like: "Message to send", and changing the actual message to another font or color.

Because most of these messages will be personalized, include placeholder text where your staff member can personalize the message. For example, To . This not only makes it easier to spot areas that need to be personalized, it also means messages can be sent out quickly and easily.

When is this useful?

To be honest, pre-drafting won't work for every type of email you send. But, there are some situations when this comes in handy, including:
  • When you are asked to provide a testimonial on a service. You can write a basic testimonial with areas for customization.
  • When you need to send follow up emails connected to a recently sent email campaign or message. You can draft a basic follow up message that can then be customized as your employees see fit.
  • When you want to post something on numerous social media sites. You can simply write the post once, then provide spots to customize based on the network.
  • Introductions and references. If you have been asked to provide a reference or an introduction, then draft a standard message which can then be changed as needed.
If you mark these emails as a pre-draft, or place them in a pre-draft folder, they can then be quickly found and modified in the future.

Looking to learn more about increasing productivity in your business? Contact us today to see how our systems can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Productivity
November 12th, 2014

BusinessValue_Nov10_ACommunication is a vital part of business. While customers certainly appreciate digital systems like email and chat, there are times when simply talking to someone is preferable. Because of this, and the fact that many businesses will always have customers who prefer to talk, most businesses do need a phone system. The question is: How do you find the right one for your business?

1. Know the types of systems out there

Phone systems, as with many other types of technology, have evolved and changed drastically from the traditional phones that we are all familiar with. As a result, it pays to be aware of the four main types of phone systems available for small to medium businesses:
  • Key systems - These systems are commonly found in many older small businesses as they were designed for up to 40 users. Typically, a Key system offers businesses basic features like hold, line switching, line management, etc.
  • PBX - Private Branch Exchange, is private phone networking technology that enables businesses to manage up to hundreds of phone lines and numbers. PBX is usually employed by larger businesses who need multiple phone lines and the ability to network offices together.
  • Hosted PBX - These are PBX systems that are managed and hosted by a provider. The system itself is usually housed offsite, which means less up-front investment for the company.
  • Centrex - These are specific business features and packages developed for your business by a major telecommunications provider which are usually added onto your monthly phone bill.
Generally speaking, these four types of phone systems are available in two ways:
  1. Analog - Traditional landline phone systems offered by phone companies, commonly referred to as PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network). Analog is familiar to many business owners as it uses existing lines strung by telephone companies.
  2. Digital - Newer phone systems that use network connections to transmit voice communication. The most common of these systems is VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol).
While there are four main systems, the increasingly popular adoption of digital systems like VoIP has led to Key and PBX systems essentially merging together into one platform. Some providers however do offer scaled down versions of PBX over network connections that they refer to as Key systems.

2. Consider these four questions

As you are looking for a new system? If so, it might be a good idea to ask yourself the following questions:
  1. How many lines and phones will I need? This will likely be one of the first questions a vendor will ask when you start looking for a new system. Take some time to think how many phone lines you will need. For example, will you need one for every employee? Or will a line for every major office or department be enough? You will quickly find that some teams won't need lines at all, while others will need one for every person.
  2. How much do I want to manage this system? If you want to have complete control over every line, the supporting systems, and the hardware itself, then going for a hosted solution may not be the best of ideas. On the other hand, if you are looking for a solution that is simple to manage for you, then hosted or managed solutions might be the answer.
  3. How fast will my business grow? If you are expanding quickly, then you will need a system that can develop with you. Many landline systems require technicians to install new lines which can take time, so businesses that are growing quickly may benefit more from digital systems.
  4. What other equipment will I be using? This is important to know before you talk to vendors because some systems may not work well with existing technology, or other systems you may be using. If you make a list, vendors can then help you quickly find a system that is compatible with your other equipment.

3. Ask your users what features they need

Before looking for a new phone system, you should ask the people who will be using the system what features they need in order to do their jobs to the best of their ability. Some teams may need wireless devices in order to better talk to customers, while others might find video conferencing worthwhile; others still may need a more unified communications platform, including text and instant messages.

The key here is to develop a list of features that your business will need before looking for a new phone system. This will make it easier to find one that fits your needs.

4. Work with your IT partner

We can work with you to help you find the best solution for your business; be it managed, digital, or analogue. If you are looking for a new phone system, contact us today to learn more about our solutions and how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

November 6th, 2014

BusinessValue_Nov03_AIT is in a near constant state of evolution, largely because of the sheer number of technology-based systems and products released on a weekly basis. This fast-paced development has led to the creation of three major IT areas. It is essential that companies invest in these three areas if they want their business to succeed.

1. Commodity-oriented IT

IT is made up of systems that support day-to-day operations, so it is essential that you invest in this area because it is what supports your core business practices. Without proper investment, your employees may not be able to carry out their tasks adequately. Commodity IT is essential but it does not bring increased value to your company. Sure, implementing a new email system could save money but it does not directly lead to increased profits.

One of the best ways businesses can get the most out of commodity IT is to first identify which systems the business relies on. From here, you can look to see if improvements can be made that will reduce overall expenses and increase productivity. Regardless of what you do with commodity IT, all changes and improvements should be operations-oriented; making jobs easier.

2. Business value focused IT

Business value IT involves any system that supports key operations and processes that drive overall business value. Essentially, these systems are not only essential, but they allow businesses and customers to do what they need to do. A good example of business value IT for companies with online stores is the technology that supports the store. Without it, customers would not be able to make purchases from the company.

With this form of IT you want to invest in systems that increase the value you offer customers and employees, while increasing your bottom line.

3. New opportunity IT

New technology and systems can help give your business a competitive advantage when properly integrated, while increasing overall business value. A good example of this is leveraging a new social media platform to help gain customer insights, or implementing technology that allows your business to capture and analyze data quickly and easily.

Companies able to incorporate new technology will often find that they have somewhat of a first mover advantage, and if leveraged correctly you could see increased profits and customer retention.

Get a good IT strategy

The vast majority of companies choose to focus a large percentage of their IT budgets on commodity IT. What this results in is a focus on simply maintaining existing IT systems, without actually investing in new systems. Ideally, you want to minimize your technology upkeep expenses, and invest more in discovering new technology and systems.

How do you do this? That's where a company like us comes in. As your IT partner, we can help ensure that your systems are managed effectively, costs are minimized, and we can even go so far as to help you find and implement new systems. Contact us today to see how our solutions can help maximize your IT investments.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

November 6th, 2014

BI_Nov03_AWhen it comes to running a business, you likely thrive on customer and employee interaction. If your customers aren't active, or employees are struggling to interact with each other and customers, you could be facing a downward spiral. One way companies try and reverse this stagnation, while simultaneously gaining important and useful data, is through gamification.

What is gamification?

It's human nature to be competitive, and many of us exercise this nature by playing games. Be it team sports, board games, video games, or even office-related games, many of us partake in some form of game on a regular basis. Gamification is the incorporation of game elements, such as points, rules of play, competition, etc. into business-related processes.

By implementing game elements into areas like marketing or training, you can drive engagement, while also collecting better data, primarily because most people will be more willing to provide relevant information when they are invested in a game.

When it comes to implementing these elements into business processes, many companies tend to focus on either customer gamification or employee gamification.

Customer gamification

The vast majority of customer-oriented gamification relates to rewards programs and repeat customers. Small to medium businesses who have successfully implemented these elements usually do so via social media and mobile apps. Repeat customers gain points for each purchase and when they reach a certain level receive a freebie perhaps or a rebate. This in turn drives the need to keep purchasing and to "win".

Many businesses have been successful in implementing this game characteristic into social media, where people who interact gain levels and therefore access to such benefits as discounts. Businesses implementing customer-oriented gamification often see both increased engagement and better data flowing into the organization. In fact, many businesses have found that the data implemented through these elements has been useful in decision-making and overall business intelligence efforts.

Employee gamification

Employee-based gamification is usually employed by businesses to encourage teams and individuals to work together towards a common goal. For example: Implementing a point or badge-based sales system where at certain sales levels badges are awarded, which can then be used for a reward, has proven to be incredibly successful for many sales-oriented companies. Publicly announced results and recognized rewards can also be a great employee motivator.

As with customer gamification, employee gamification can be a great source of data. For example, by tracking where employees are, and their results, you can quickly see weak spots or places where help may be needed. Essentially, more data means the ability to make better decisions.

Should my company implement gamification?

While this may sound like an exciting, and useful tactic to implement in your business, it's not for everyone and it won't fit well with all activities. What you should do is to look at whether the objectives and goals of the program you wish to implement can also be paired with gamification.

If you find that gamification, or elements of it, won't benefit your business program, then it's best not to implement it for the sake of it.

How to implement gamification

There are a wide number of mobile apps developed around gamification, along with social elements and ideas. What we suggest is talking to us to see how we can help first. We can work with you to find solutions and ways to implement your solutions. Contact us today to start the game of business success.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

November 4th, 2014

As a follow up to our previous blog, we wanted to share a very helpful ZDNet article by Ed Botts who provides step-by-step instructions on two-factor authentication for cloud credentials to help protect online data.

Bott argues that two-factor authentication (2FA) is “no longer optional” to mitigate risk for cloud services, and he has provided a series of images that show exactly how to enable two-factor authentication for some of the most popular cloud-based services including Microsoft Exchange, Google Docs, Office 365, Dropbox, Facebook and Twitter.

While it may take an extra step or two to set up two-factor authentication, Bott says “…the assurance that your secrets will remain safe even in the event of a password breach is worth a few seconds of extra verification.”

We could not agree more. It is critical to Sinu’s mission to keep our customers’ data safe, and we are constantly monitoring network security. We regularly advise that with a little effort, Facebook, Google, or other cloud-based accounts, need not be a weak link in security protocol.

Topic Articles
November 4th, 2014

Remember your first credit card? That feeling of power and of acceptance into a new financial world, soon enough followed by your first credit card bill – a sometimes harsh reality of that new financial world.

According to a recent report by Business Week, “Researchers have long found that shoppers spend more the further they get from handling actual currency and tend to better remember cash transactions. These tendencies help explain why credit card balances tend to bloat and why casinos use chips in place of money… Behavioral economists have a term for this dynamic: decoupling. The card or app or casino chip mentally separates the consumer from his bank account. The payment is both delayed and bundled with other charges so it doesn’t seem so painful.”

Which brings us to the new Apple Pay.

Hiawatha Bray, the Boston Globe tech writer, got it right when he began a report stating that “my iPhone 6 just turned into a credit card.” But he might have added that it turned into a different kind of credit card – a seamless, virtual payment system detached from the psychology of handing over cold hard cash or a piece of plastic. iPhone in hand, Bray admitted that he “went on a rather pathetic spending spree – French fries at McDonald’s, another candy bar at the Star Market on Morrissey Boulevard [in Dorchester, MA]. Always, the experience was instantaneous, and painless.”

Quick and painless spending is why Apple Pay may prove to be a welcome boon to retailers who have long understood that separating the immediate gratification of a purchase from the harsh reality of payment can unleash powerful spending patterns. Writing in the “Retail Therapy” blog for Psychology Today, Scott Rick, Ph.D notes that “… research also suggests that credit cards can stimulate overspending: People are often willing to pay more for the same product when using credit than when using cash. Certainly, outside the lab, there are many trait-based explanations for such a ‘credit card premium’…”

The “credit card premium” and the strong psychology of buy now, pay later are very real, and what’s being missed in the whiz-bang story of Apple Pay is that these mobile payment systems offer a new world of convenience – along with some of the problems of the old world of credit card spending. So while it may be a blessing for retailers, is the ease of just waving your iPhone near a register going to increase the usual problems associated with managing credit, particularly for millennials who tend to be early adopters?

Topic Articles
November 4th, 2014

Whether it’s the BASH flaw we blogged about recently, the JP Morgan/Chase hack this summer, or the discovery of the Reddit Mac iWorm, it seems that news about data breaches has been more prevalent than ever. Data security has never been more important – as the amount of data that is stored online continues to increase and hackers get significantly more sophisticated, making even the savviest of computer users susceptible to breaches.

While a business may wonder how they can keep their data safe when companies that have the resources of JP Morgan and Target are victims, there are several ways you can help mitigate the risk. We’ve listed a few of these “best practices” below.

1. Create and Manage Strong Passwords

Believe it or not, CBS News reported that the top three passwords of 2014 are, “123456,” “password” and “12345678.” As we noted in a recent blog, it’s important to develop passwords that are not immediately easy to uncover (no dog’s names, kid’s names, anniversaries, etc.). Instead, be sure to use at least eight characters, incorporating numbers and capital letters. Password generators can help as well, and using password managers can help keep track of your passwords and even automatically log you in. You should also use very different passwords for your less critical solutions, such as entertainment and social media sites, as you do for email and financial accounts.

2. Review Your Password-Protected Systems

Keep track of which systems require passwords and who has access to them. Review system security regularly and remove any unused accounts. Reset those passwords at least once a year – more often if you have high employee turnover.

3. Reduce Risk by Removing Unused Technology

Eliminate any Business Solutions which are no longer used. You should export data to a permanent storage solution, like a DVD, and shut down the unused system. We don’t recommend keeping technology around “just in case,” because it is another security risk.

4. Integrate Authentication

Try to integrate the authentication of as many of your systems as possible. Several systems now support ‘Single Sign On’ where one system will let you in if you have already authenticated to another one. Explore these possibilities with your IT team to reduce the number of passwords you need to enter. The less passwords you have the more willing you will be to make your passwords “strong” and it will shrink your risk profile.

5. Online Transactions

Never use your debit card at a place you don’t trust completely, use a credit card instead because your credit card has limited liability while your debit card does not. The security protocols for online commerce vary greatly, and it’s important to shop from trusted sites. For example, while even the well-trusted Ebay got hacked earlier this year, they responded quickly and alerted their members, automatically requiring each person to reset their password.

6. Recognize Phishing

While most of us are now aware of the most popular phishing scams (someone you know is stuck in a European country and has lost all their credit cards), it’s becoming harder to tell a spam email from a legitimate one. Here are a few tips to help you recognize a hacker that might be phishing for your data:

  • If you receive an email from what looks like a trusted company (especially your bank), avoid clicking on the link. Instead, type the URL of that company directly in the browser. Banks don’t ask for personal information to be given by general URL or by email.
  • If a company sends you an email asking you to call them, look up their contact information online. Don’t use the phone number in the email. If it’s a criminal, you’ll be calling them and not your trusted company representative.
  • Review the email reply address. Once you click “reply,” you can see the email address in your reply field. If it looks suspicious, it probably isn’t safe to communicate. Phishers often cloak the email address when they email you, hoping you won’t look deeper to discover it’s a phony email.

7. Instant Messaging

Instant messaging (IM) has become a common means to communicate, even in the workplace. When you IM with friends or colleagues, do not give out critical information through IM because it is impossible to know whether the other computer is secure.

If you have any questions about the security of your technology, give us a call and we would be happy to tell you about the Sinu Solution and how we keep your data safe.

Topic Articles
November 4th, 2014

Is it just a fact of life now that we all need to be ‘on’ 24/7? Most would agree that we feel obligated to carry our smartphones and tablets everywhere, answer emails after hours, and from vacation. Our vacation bounceback messages often hint that emails will be checked from time to time, and so we continue to stay connected. It is hard for many people to write a vacation email that states they are completely unavailable to answer emails. How would it look to our clients and employees? Would it seem like we don’t care about their messages? The pressure is on when so many of our colleagues continue to show how dedicated they are by answering emails during their time off. So we never really ‘turn off’ and our stress levels continue climb.

In a Wall Street Journal report, Dr. Jennifer Deal, a senior research scientist at the Center for Creative Leadership, explains our compulsion to stay connected and how much time it is taking up: “My research shows that people use their smartphones so much outside of business hours—reading and responding to streams of messages from the office—that many end up putting in 13 hours or more a day. But they’re not doing that extra work because they want to. They’re doing it because they feel compelled to, and because the smartphone makes it so easy.”


From WSJ Report, 10/27/14, “How Technology Can Help Work/Life Balance”

Two recent articles, published the same day (one in the US and one in Great Britain), address this issue of stress related to over-connectivity and they provide two very different sets of solutions.

The BBC did an article that introduced some new technologies to help deal with personal stress. According to the report, “the biosensor device, called Pip, is gripped between the thumb and forefinger, looks a bit like a small iPod, and measures sweat and electrodermal activity associated with stress levels.” This is then supposed to make you more mindful of your stress levels. If this device indicates high levels of stress, they suggest going online to play some stress-relieving games. (Perhaps there will be a renewed interest in Atari’s Pong for such times?) They even suggest you can use a stress reduction texting app in Britain called “Buddy” to share how stressed you are feeling each day.

Then there is the previously referenced WSJ article by Dr. Deal that provided some practical tips to help return a “work/life balance” by modifying a few behaviors in the workplace. Here are a few tips based, in part, on Dr. Deal’s recommendations:

  1. Email Senders Should Prioritize Emails

    Problem: Not all emails are equally urgent, and some don’t even require a response. However, this is a time drain since employees have to read through each and every message to determine how important a note is and whether they need to answer it.

    Solution: Make the priority of your email clear to the recipient. Let them know when you expect a response and especially if this is low priority or just FYI. If you do this with recipients of your email, they might notice and give you the same courtesy – saving you both time.

  2. Put Emails on Hold

    Problem: We are pulled away from our life when people who get an idea after work hours want to pass it along before they forget, or want to send us information late in the day so we have it first thing in the morning.

    Solution: Turn off the notifications on your email program and mobile device so that you can check email when you can fully focus on responding completely. In time your recipients will get in sync with your rhythm and give you more detailed and complete requests and responses.

  3. Don’t Overschedule Yourself

    Problem: Another reason people work after hours is that they have overbooked their day, leaving little time for at-work tasks so they still have work they have to get done during off hours.

    Solution: Leave discrete time in your schedule to respond to emails and prepare for upcoming meetings or calls. These little bits of time will make your use of scheduled time much more efficient so you can get things done during work hours rather than playing catch-up in off hours.

Here at Sinu we believe people matter, objects don’t. Let us know if we can help you fine tune your technology to prevent time-wasting, support productivity and efficiency, and find a work/life balance, while still retaining the option to work anywhere and anytime.

Topic Articles